Navy Uniform POD Notes


Navy POD Notes sorted by Category
Navy Uniform Standards

Seabag Contents (8 May 2010)
Dog tags are not addressed in Navy Uniform Regulations and are not part of the Navy seabag. Reference MILPERSMAN 1000-070 for information on dog tags.

Military I.D. Card (21 Aug 2010)
Carrying the military identification card. There is nothing in the Navy Uniform Regulations that states that the military identification card must be carried in a particular location. I suspect that many of us were directed in Recruit Training to carry our I.D. card in our pocket and that has been interpreted as the “policy” for the Navy.

Seabag Uniform Items (24 Aug 2010)
Information on the useful life of seabag uniform items can be found in Chapter 3, Section 5, under Active Seabag Requirements List.

Uniform Note (30 Jan 2010)
Conservative jewelry is authorized for all personnel and shall be in good taste while in uniform. Eccentricities or faddishness are not permitted (NOTE: The plastic cancer research and organization support wrist bands are not authorized while in uniform). Jewelry shall not present a safety or FOD (Foreign Object Damage) hazard.

Uniform Note (23 Feb 2010)
Fingernails for men shall not extend beyond the end of the finger; and fingernails for women shall not exceed 1/4 inch beyond the end of the finger.

Uniform Note (9 Mar 2010)
Polishing or plating of medals is prohibited.

Uniform Note (11 Apr 2010)
Dinner Dress Jacket uniforms is optional for Enlisted (E-1 – E-6) personnel when Dinner Dress uniforms are prescribed. Refer to Navy Uniform Regulations, Chapter 3, Section 4, Articles 3401, 3402, 3403 and 3404 for further details.

Uniform Note (2 May 2010)
Personnel assigned to duties, which prematurely destroy uniform items, should be issued coveralls or protective outer garments. Uniform items, which are destroyed due to lack of adequate protective garments, should be replaced by the command. For additional information refer to NAVSUP Manual P485.

Uniform History (5 May 2010)
STRIPES AND STARS ON JUMPER UNIFORMS–on 18 January 1876, Rear Admiral Stephen B. Luce recommended a collar with stars and stripes as a substitute for the plain collar used on the frocks of seamen. Three stripes on the collar were proposed for all grades, with the stripes on the cuffs to indicated grade, one stripe for E-1, etc.

Navy Colors (17 May 2010)
On 27 August 1802 the Secretary of the Navy signed an instruction, which set a pattern for the dress of the U.S. Navy in Blue and Gold.

Uniform Note (18 May 2010)
No transfer or exchange of an enlisted person’s uniform clothing shall be made without the commanding officer’s authorization. When such transfers or exchanges are authorized, or when clothing belonging to deserters is sold, the name of the former owner shall be obliterated with a red D.C. stamp. Purchaser’s name shall be placed above, below, or next to it.

Rating Badges (19 May 2010)
Rating badges are required to be worn on the peacoat for Petty Officers (E-4 to E-6), when in uniform. Seaman and below (E1 –E3) do not wear any military insignia in their peacoat. When wearing the peacoat as civilian attire, all military insignia must be removed from the peacoat.

Uniform Note (22 May 2010)
A well-known Navy myth is that a Sailor whose ship sinks can wear a gold earring in uniform. Review of current and historical uniform regulations does not indicate that this has ever been an authorized practice. It’s certainly an interesting bit of scuttlebutt, though.

Ball Caps (24 May 2010)
Ball caps may be worn on board ship and pier in the immediate vicinity of ship, and ashore in the immediate workspaces. The wearing of ball caps with Service uniforms is restricted to the immediate workspaces for shore Sailors.

Uniform Note (26 May 2010)
Uniforms may be tailored to provide a well-fitting, professional military bearing. They shall not be altered to the extent of detracting from a military appearance, nor shall they be tailored to the point of presenting a tight form fit.

Uniform Note (29 May 2010)
Personnel that are required wear tennis shoes due to medical conditions “tennis shoe chit” status. The Navy Uniform Regulations does not address this particular situation. However, it is recommend to the Sailor to take a “common sense” approach to this matter, the shoes should be one color, either white or black tennis shoes. Do not wear vivid or conspicuous colors such as red, yellow, bright blue, pink, etc. that would significantly detract from a professional appearance in uniform.

Uniform History (7 Jun 2010)
PEACOAT–a cold weather version of the first uniform authorized– the Pea-Jacket. A warm, heavy coat made from “Pee” cloth or “Pilot” cloth, a course stout kind of twilled blue cloth with a nap on one side.

Uniform History (14 Jun 2010)
Bell bottom trousers are commonly believed to have been introduced in 1817 to permit men to roll them above the knee when washing down the decks, and to make it easier to remove them in a hurry when forced to abandon ship or when washed overboard. The trousers may be used as a life preserver by knotting the legs.

Uniform History (20 Jun 2010)
The Secretary of War issued the first uniform instruction for the U.S. Navy on 24 August 1791. It provided a distinctive dress for the officers who would command the ships of the Federal Navy. The instruction did not include a uniform for the enlisted man, although there was a degree of uniformity. The usual dress of a seaman was made up of a short jacket, shirt, vest, long trousers, and a black low crowned hat.

Uniform History (29 Jun 2010)
KHAKI–originated in 1845 in India where British soldiers soaked white uniforms in mud, coffee, and curry powder to blend in with the landscape. Khakis made their debut in the U.S. Navy in 1912 when they were worn by naval aviators, and were adopted for submarines in 1931. In 1941 the Navy approved khakis for on-station wear by senior officers, and soon after Pearl Harbor chiefs and officers were authorized to wear khakis ashore on liberty.

Uniform History (30 Jun 2010)
WHITE HAT–In 1852 a white cover was added to the soft visor-less blue hat. In 1866 a white sennit straw hat was authorized as an additional item. During the 1880’s the white “sailors hat” appeared as a low rolled brim high-domed item made of wedge shaped pieces of canvas to replace the straw hat. The canvas was eventually replaced by cotton as a cheaper more comfortable material. Many complaints on the quality and construction led to modifications ending in the currently used white hat.

Navy Uniform Regulations (15 Aug 2010)
The trend of body modification is becoming popular among America’s youth, so Navy Uniform Matters Office clarified what is, or isn’t, acceptable for service members. According to the Navy Uniform Regulations, any mutilation of the body is prohibited. Tattoos are becoming less taboo in our society. More extreme examples of self expression -— scarification and mutilation —- are also becoming mainstream. The Navy Uniform Regulations Manual gives several examples of mutilation: • Forking the tongue • Enlarged or stretched holes in the ears • Foreign objects under the skin that create a design or pattern • Intentional scarring • Intentional burns • Dental ornamentation Navy regulations say body piercings are prohibited while in uniform, working in any Navy-related capacity or while on any military property. Women, however, are allowed to wear one ball-studded earring in each ear.

Navy Revises Special Duty Assignment Pay (26 Aug 2010)
NAVADMIN 140/07 revises pay levels for special duty assignment pay (SDAP). Sailors recieve SDAP for filling special assignments that are hard to fill with quality volunteers; it applies specifically to individual billets that require an extra degree of effort to perform. The list of billets includes advanced underwater construction divers, nuclear propulsion plant operators, recruiters, recruit division commanders and air traffic controllers to name a few. The SDAP program is designed to enhance the Navy’s ability to size, shape and stabilize the force, encouraging Sailors with important skills to apply their knowledge and experience to difficult or challenging assignments. New levels became effective June 1 following the release of the NAVADMIN. For more information on SDAP and other incentive pay programs, visit www.npc.navy.mil.

Uniform History (12 Oct 2010)
On 18 January 1876, Rear Adm. Stephen B. Luce recommended a collar with stars and stripes as a substitute for the plain collar used on the frocks of seamen. Three stripes on the collar were proposed for all grades, with the stripes on the cuffs to indicated grade, one stripe for E-1, etc.

Uniform Standards (23 Nov 2010)
All hands are reminded that corfram shoes may only be worn immediately departing or returning to the ship or when authorized by the commading officer for ceremonial or other special occasions – never in the main space. Leather shoes are required aboard ship. Inport Quarterdeck watches are not exempt from this requirement, however Commanding Officer’s normally authorizes Corframs for QD watches. Corframs are only allowed when coming to or leaving the ship. For more information review OPNAVINST 5100.19D, B-1203 and B-1203(b).

Uniform Note (29 Dec 2010)
Earrings for women are an optional item, and are not required for wear. When worn the earring shall be a 4-6mm ball (gold for officers/CPOs, and silver for E-6 and below), plain with brushed, matte finish, screw-on or post type. Pearl earrings may be worn with Dinner Dress or Formal uniforms.

Tattoos and Piercing Regulations (16 Mar 2010)
Four criteria have been issued to commanders to assist them in determining whether a tattoo, body art or brand should be permitted: content, location, size and whether the item is required for cosmetic purposes. Navy policy stipulates that any tattoo/body art/brand that is obscene, sexually explicit or advocates discrimination of any sort is prohibited. Administrative separation could result for personnel disregarding this guidance. For more information, visit NAVADMIN 110/06.

NAVADMIN 152/08 (14 Jun 2010)
Per NAVADMIN 152/08, effective immediately, U.S. Navy personnel assigned either permanently or temporarily to U.S. Army commands in combat, who, with the concurrence of the CNO, are awarded the Combat Infantryman Badge or Combat Medical Badge, are authorized to wear the combat action ribbon upon completion of their assignment with the Army.

Campaign Medals (7 Jul 2010)
NAVADMIN 141/08 announced the establishment of campaign stars for the Afghanistan and Iraq campaign medals for Navy personnel.

New Uniform Now Available (31 Jul 2010)
NAVADMIN 190/08 announced the new E1-E6 Service Uniform (SU) is available for purchase in Great Lakes and California Navy Exchanges. The SU is for year-round wear and replaces the summer white and winter blue uniforms. It is authorized to be worn for office work, watchstanding, liberty or business ashore when prescribed as the uniform of the day. Sailors will have up to 24 months to purchase the new uniform, depending on their duty station location. The mandatory wear date for all E1-E6 personnel is July 2010. Clothing replacement allowances for fiscal years 2008 and 2009 were increased to cover the purchasing of two sets of new uniforms by July 2010. The SU will be available for purchase via Navy Exchange uniform centers as follows: July 08, Great Lakes and California Oct 08, Northwest and Hawaii Jan 09, Gulf region and Millington, Tenn. April 09, Naval District Washington July 09, Tidewater Oct 09, Southeast Jan 10, Northeast April 10, Europe/Japan/Guam

Combat Action Ribbon Eligibility (18 Aug 2010)
Per NAVADMIN 152/08, effective immediately, U.S. Navy personnel assigned either permanently or temporarily to U.S. Army commands in combat, who, with the concurrence of the CNO, are awarded the Combat Infantryman Badge or Combat Medical Badge, are authorized to wear the combat action ribbon upon completion of their assignment with the Army.

Campaign Medals (22 Aug 2010)
NAVADMIN 141/08 announced the establishment of campaign stars for the Afghanistan and Iraq campaign medals for Navy personnel.

History of the Khaki Uniform (2 Sep 2010)
KHAKI–originated in 1845 in India where British soldiers soaked white uniforms in mud, coffee, and curry powder to blend in with the landscape. Khakis made their debut in the U.S. Navy in 1912 when they were worn by naval aviators, and were adopted for submarines in 1931. In 1941, the Navy approved khakis for on-station wear by senior officers, and soon after Pearl Harbor chiefs and officers were authorized to wear khakis ashore on liberty.

Establishment of Campaign Stars (9 Sep 2010)
NAVADMIN 141/08 announced the establishment of campaign stars for the Afghanistan and Iraq campaign medals for Navy personnel.

Campaign Medals for Navy Personnel (12 Oct 2010)
NAVADMIN 141/08 announced the establishment of campaign stars for the Afghanistan and Iraq campaign medals for Navy personnel.

Navy Working Uniform Availability Announced (28 Jan 2010)
The Chief of Naval Personnel released detailed information about the delivery schedule, manner of wear and occasion for wear for the Navy Working Uniform (NWU) in NAVADMIN 343/08. An instructional video was also posted on the NPC Web site www.npc.navy.mil/commandsupport/usnavyuniforms/ and on NKO at https://wwwa.nko.navy.mil/portal/alertscommunity/home/whatsnewonnko. The NWU is now available for Navy leadership (flag officers, commanding officers/OICs, (9580/9579/9578) command master/senior chiefs, and chiefs of the boat) via Navy Exchange Uniform Support Center at 800-368-4088 or 757-502-7450. The NWU will be available for purchase via designated Navy Exchange Uniform Centers as follows: Jan 09 – Tidewater; Apr 09 – Southeast; Jul 09 – Northeast; Oct 09 – Capital region; Jan 10 – Western/northwest; Apr 10 – Gulf region; Jul 10 – Hawaii; Oct 10 – Europe/Japan/Guam. All existing working uniforms will continue to be authorized for wear until December 2010. Sailors who have not been issued NWU’s at recruit training command or purchased NWU’s while assigned to an active rollout location must maintain their current working uniforms until the NWU is available in the area assigned. This policy also applies to Sailors wearing the new service uniform announced earlier in 2008. FY08 and FY09 clothing replacement allowances have been adjusted to facilitate purchasing four sets of NWU shirts and trousers by December 2010. Reserve component Sailors will receive their uniforms via their respective Navy Operational Support Centers. For more information on uniforms and uniform policy, visit the uniform matters Web site at www.npc.navy.mil/commandsupport/usnavyuniforms/.

Uniform Changes Announced (25 May 2010)
The chief of naval personnel released NAVADMIN 149-09 to announce the latest changes to Navy uniform policies including maternity uniforms, physical fitness uniforms, the Air Force Space Badge and changes to uniform board membership. The Navy is developing a new element to the physical fitness uniform (PTU) to replace or augment current Navy sweat pants and shirts. This fall, a competitive wear-test of two Navy designed PTU fitness suits will determine their suitability as mandatory uniform components. Fleet introduction is expected during fiscal year 2011. Additionally, a new high performance version of the physical training uniform will be made available this winter. The optional PTU shirt and short will be manufactured from a “name brand” company and will follow the existing manner and occasion for wear as the standard fitness gear. Another major component of the NAVADMIN addresses changes to the maternity uniform policy. Sailors E-1 to E6 who are pregnant, are temporarily authorized to wear the service khaki maternity blouse currently worn by chiefs and officers with the winter blue maternity slacks or skirt. This is an interim authorization until the improved single design maternity blouse for all ranks is introduced to the fleet in fiscal year 2010.

Navy Working Uniform Roll-out Accelerated (20 Nov 2010)
Navy Exchange Command is accelerating its distribution schedule of the Navy Working Uniform (NWU), due to sufficient inventory of the most in-demand sizes, according to NAVADMIN 328/09. NWU components are now available for purchase and ordering at uniform centers located at Navy Exchange regions in the Southwest and Northwest. Accelerated availability will take affect in the national capital region, and Hawaii beginning Nov. 30; and at Navy Exchange regions Europe, Japan and Guam commencing March 15. The mandatory wear date remains Dec. 31, 2010 to ensure all Sailors have time to acquire correctly fitted uniform items. To aid Sailors in ensuring the proper fit of the uniform, manufacturers have been conducting fit clinics at select rollout locations. To read NAVADMIN 328/09, visit http://www.npc.navy.mil/NR/rdonlyres/62FE6EFE-529D-4FE5-BEFE-A6EE523F3D3B/0/NAV09328.txt.

Information Dominance Corps Warfare Insignia Approved (22 Feb 2010)
The chief of naval operations has approved the Information Dominance Corps Warfare insignia Feb. 19 for wear by officers and enlisted who complete a rigorous personal qualification program. The qualification requirements will be outlined in a forthcoming Navy instruction. The warfare insignia was created to provide a common linkage among the IDC communities and institute a rigorous qualification program to identify the Navy’s highly qualified and diversified information dominance professionals. The new officer insignia is a two and three-quarter inches by one and one-eighth inches, gold matte metal pin showing a background of ocean waves, a crossed naval officer’s sword and lightning bolt with a fouled anchor and globe and will also be available in a miniature size. The enlisted insignia is a two and three-quarter inches by one and one-eighth inches, silver oxidized metal pin showing a background of ocean waves, a crossed naval enlisted cutlass and lightning bolt with a fouled anchor and globe and will also be available in a miniature size. The insignias will be available for purchase at Navy Exchange Uniform Centers and Navy Exchange Uniform Support Center by August 2010. Graphics of the insignias are available on the Navy Uniform Matters Web site http://www.npc.navy.mil/commandsupport/usnavyuniforms/ Additional information is provided in NAVADMIN 058/10.